Narrative (Journal)
Descendants of Boling G. Morris

I.Boling G.1 Morris. Boling G. Morris was born in 1819 in Georgia.1,2   Boling married Susan P. (--?--) on 6 August 1840, in Jones County, Georgia.  The wedding was performed by by James Gray, J.I.C.3

Boling was enumerated as head of household in the census of 1 June 1850 in Jones County, Georgia, as "Boling G. Morris".  He is listed as a 30-year-old farmer, born in Georgia.4   In addition, he was shown on the 1 June 1850 Slave Schedule as owning three female slaves, ages 30, 18, and 2, along with four male slaves, ages 35, 8, 7, and 4.5  Boling married Margaret Henrietta M. Lester, daughter of David Lester and Elizabeth "Betsy" Mullins, sometime between 1 June 1850 and 11 December 1854.6,7

Boling was listed as head of household in the census of 1860 in Houston County, Georgia, as "Bollin E. Morris".   This census described him as a 41-year-old white male, born in Georgia, who owned real estate property valued at $10,000.   Also in his home were "Margret," age 31;  Mary, age 18,  James, 15;  William, age 14;  Sarah E., 12;  John C., age 10; and Benjamin, 6 -- all born in Georgia.  Two additional children: [Margaret Henrietta's two older children] were listed as "Elizabeth Alfred," age 14, and "James Alfred," age 13, both born in Georgia.8   [Despite the census taker's misspelling of their names, these two children were obviously Marilla Elizabeth Aldredge and James Lester Aldredge.]

On 1 April 1861 in Houston County, Georgia,9  John A. Hammack gave bond of $3,500 as administrator of the estate of Alexander Martin (desceased, of Houston County).   James M. Hammack and Boling G. Morris acted as his securities on the bond.

[The military information in this paragraph, which I had assumed to be accurate, has proven to be the inaccurate. There were two Boling Morris's in Georgia during the mid-1800's.  The military records below actually belong to Boling Morris whose widow was Sarah C. Morris. . . not Margaret Henrietta Lester Aldredge Morris.  This updated information was obtained through pension records and shared with me by Pam Morris on October 13, 2004.]
On 11 September 1863, Boling Morris enlisted as a private in Company K, 65th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry.  The regiment had been organized in May 1862, as Company K, Infantry Battalion, Smith's Legion, Georgia Volunteers; it became Company K, 65th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, in March of 1863.  Boling was listed as sick in hospital on 29 October 1863.10   He was captured by Union troops near Pine Mountain, Georgia, on June 20. 1864, and died on 10 August 1864 in Camp Morton Union Prison, Indiana.11  He was buried in Grave No. 1043, Green Lawn Cemetery (Indiana?).12

On 19 January 1865 in Houston County, Georgia,  William P. Simmons posted a bond of $400,000, with Benjamin Stripling acting as security, for the administration of the estate of Boling G. Morris, late of Houston County .13    On 5 February 1866 in Houston County, Georgia, William P. Simmons, Admistrator de bonis non cum testo annexo, as Principal and Benjamin Stripling and Edward Green, Securities, gave bond in the sum of $40,000.  William P. Simmons was pledged to make "a true and perfect inventory of goods, chattels, rights, credits, lands, and tenements of Boling G. Morris, late of said county, dec'd . . .unless Will be discovered ."14

A.Mary2 Morris. Mary Morris was born circa 1841 in Georgia.15,16

Mary was enumerated in the home of Boling G. Morris in the 1 June 1850 census in Jones County, Georgia, as "Mary Morris". She was listed as a nine-year-old female, born in Georgia.17

Mary was enumerated with Boling G. Morris in the 1860 census in Houston County, Georgia, as "Mary Morris". She was listed as an 18-year-old female, born in Georgia.  Living in the same home were "Margret Morris" (her step-mother); James, Sarah E., William, John C. Morris, and Benjamin Morris -- siblings; as well as James and Elizabeth "Alfred (step brother and sister)."18

B.James2 Morris. James Morris was born circa 1844 in Georgia.19,20

James was enumerated in the home of Boling G. Morris in the 1 June 1850 census in Jones County, Georgia, as "James Morris".  He was listed as a six-year-old male.21

James was enumerated with Boling G. Morris in the 1860 census in Houston County, Georgia, as "James Morris".  He was listed as a 15-year-old male, born in Georgia.  Living in the same home were "Margret Morris (his step-mother); Mary, Sarah E., William, John C., and Benjamin Morris; and James and Elizabeth "Alfred."22

C.William2 Morris was also known as William D.? Morris.23 He was also known as W. D.? Morris.24 William Morris was born circa 1846 in Georgia.25

William was enumerated in the home of Boling G. Morris in the 1 June 1850 census in Jones County, Georgia, as "William Morris." He was listed as a four-year-old male.26

William was enumerated with Boling G. Morris in the 1860 census in Houston County, Georgia, as "William Morris". He was listed as a 14-year-old male, born in Georgia. Living in the same home were Margret Morris (his step-mother); Mary, Sarah E., James,  John C., and Benjamin Morris; and James and Elizabeth "Alfred."27

William Morris and Mollie Hogan obtained a marriage license on 23 December 1865 in Houston County, Georgia.28,29 William marriedMollie on 25 December 1865, in Houston County, Georgia.30   A William Morris marriedHenrietta Gray on 26 December 1872, in Houston County, Georgia.  The marriage license was issued 25 December 1872 to Miss Henrietta Gray and "W. D. Morris."31,32

D.Sarah E.2 Morris was also known as Martha(?) Morris.33 Sarah E. Morris was born circa 1848 in Georgia.34,35

Sarah was enumerated in the home of Boling G. Morris in the 1 June 1850 census in Jones County, Georgia, as "Martha" Morris. She is listed as a two-year-old female.36

Sarah E. was enumerated with Boling G. Morris in the 1860 census in Houston County, Georgia, as "Sarah E. Morris". She was listed as a 12-year-old female, born in Georgia.  Living in the same home were Margret Morris (her step-mother); James, Mary, William, John C., and Benjamin Morris; and James and Elizabeth "Alfred."37

Sarah E. Morris and John G. Woodard obtained a marriage license on 6 January 1866 in Houston County, Georgia.38,39  Sarah and John married on 9 January 1866, in Houston County, Georgia.

E.John C.2 Morris. John C. Morris was born in 1850 in Georgia.40,41,42

John was enumerated in the home of Boling G. Morris in the 1 June 1850 census in Jones County, Georgia, as "John C." Morris. He was listed as a four-month-old male.43

John C. was enumerated with Boling G. Morris in the 1860 census in Houston County, Georgia, as "John C. Morris". He was listed as a 10-year-old male, born in Georgia.  Living in the same home were Margret Morris (his step-mother); Mary, Sarah E., William, James, and Benjamin Morris; and James and Elizabeth "Alfred."44  John married Mary C. Bell on 6 December 1870, in Houston County, Georgia.  One of John's daughters, Johnnie Clyde, died on 29 October 1885.45  John C. Morris died on 13 April 1890 in Tharps's Mill, Houston County, Georgia.46,47  He was buried in the family burial ground in the same county.48  His obituary states: Mr. John C. Morris died on April 13, 1890 by drowning just beyond Tharp's Mill in the tenth district.   He either fell or was thrown from the buggy into the stream.  He was 40 years old and leaves a wife and four children.  Burial was in the family burial ground.49

The Macon Telegraph, on Tuesday Morning, April 15, 1890, contained the following article:
Death of John H. Morris
Found dead in a shallow stream in Houston County.
Suspicion of Foul Play Has Aroused the Community - An Investigation Will Be Had - A theory as to the Cause of His Death
    News was received in the city yesterday of the mysterious death of John H. Morris, a prosperous farmer of Houston county, Friday, near Tharpe's mill.
    The death, from all accounts, has as yet not been investigated, although the circumstances surrounding it certainly seem to demand a thorough one.
    Morris, it seems, lives in the neighborhood of Tharpe's mill. He had hitched up his wagon a few minutes before sundown Friday night, and had started toward Perry. A negro man was seen helping him to hitch up, and it is said also got in the wagon and rode off with him.
    A few hundred yards of the mill a small stream, with scarcely six inches of water, runs across the road.
    With his face down and his head buried in the sand, mud and water, the body of Morris was found about noon Saturday. Before sunrise Saturday his half brother had driven by the place, and had failed to see the body of his relative.
    The mule and wagon were found entangled in the bushes close by, and in a ravine. The mule had either been driven into the bushes or had run away. Everything goes to show, however, that he was driven into the ravine.

What Killed Morris.
    The question that is now agitating the neighborhood is what caused Morris' death. It was first supposed that he had fallen in a faint out of the wagon into the water while crossing the stream and before regaining consciousness had smothered to death in the water. Later this theory was abandoned and it is now thought that he was knocked off the wagon seat and killed and his body left in the water.
    Morris was about 30 years of age and was a prosperous, energetic farmer. He was well liked in the community and no doubt there will be an investigation into his death. The news received in the city yesterday was quite meager and the full details could not be learned.
    Special Officer O Pry [?] of the police force knew Morris and was well acquainted with the country where he lived. He doubts the theory of Morris falling into the stream and says that it is scarcely six inches deep, and there is not enough water in it to drown a man.
    Morris has relatives in Bibb county, and it is thought also in Savannah. He was known to a large number in Macon. All are interested in the investigation of his death.50

On 3 July 1890 in Houston County, J. O. Sandefur as Principal and E. S. Wellons as Security posted bond in the amount of $2,600 for the administration of the estate of J. C. Morris (late of Houston County).51

F.Benjamin2 Morris was also known as Benjamin F.? Morris.52 Benjamin Morris was born circa 1854 in Georgia.53

Benjamin was enumerated with Boling G. Morris in the 1860 census in Houston County, Georgia, as "Benjamin Morris". He was listed as a six-year-old male, born in Georgia. Living in the same home were "Margret Morris" (his mother or step-mother?); Mary, Sarah E., William, James, and John C. Morris -- (siblings); "Elizabeth Alfred" (Margaret's daughter) and "James Alfred" (Margaret's son).54  Benjamin married Mary Crouch on 17 November 1873, in Houston County, Georgia.  The marriage license was issued on 15 November.55,56

G.Jasper Florence2 Morris. Jasper Florence Morris was born on 22 October 1860 in "the old homestead," Houston County, Georgia.57,58

Jasper Florence was enumerated with Margaret Henrietta M. Lester in the 1870 census in Perry, Houston County as "Jasper Morris".  He was listed as a nine-year-old white male, born in Georgia.  He had attended school in the year of the census.  Jasper's personal property was valued at $3,000.  Also enumerated in the home were "Charles Morris," age seven, and "Jas. L. Aldridge," age 23.59  At age 17 Jasper married Martha "Mattie" Pauline Barfield, daughter of Bennett Barfield and N. C. Barfield, on 30 December 1877, in the home of the bride in Houston County.60,61  Jasper Florence died in 1932, at his home, Lake City, Florida.62  He was buried in Chauncy, Georgia.63

Jasper's obituary from "The Macon Telegraph" states:
CORDELE, Ga., May 18. -- Last rites were held Wednesday for Judge J. F. Morris, Rev. T. H. Williams, pastor of the Cordele Methodist church, officiating.
    Judge Morris was 72 years of age at the time of his death, and had been a resident of Cordele for a number of years prior to his removal to Lake City, Fla., several weeks ago. He had been in failing health for some time.
    Judge Morris was a member of the Methodist church for a number of years.
    Following the services at the chapel, the funeral party left for Chauncey, his former home, for the committal service. The pallbearers were: Ernest Taylor, Frank Calloway, Jack Sheppard, Palmer Greene, Burchell Mitchell and Dr. A. J. Whelchel.
    Judge Morris' survivors include: One daughter, Mrs. Catherine Allen, of Lake City, Fla.; granddaughter, Mrs. Guy T. Cobb, of Cordele; brother, C. E. Morris, of Tampa; nephew, Fred Morris, of High Point, N. C. His wife died eight years ago.64

Jasper's obituary from an unknown newspaper (probably Cordele, Georgia) states:
JUDGE J. F. MORRIS PASSES IN FLORIDA
FORMER ESTEEMED RESIDENT OF CORDELE, SUCCUMBS THIS MORNING IN LAKE CITY
    Judge F. F. Morris, former resident of Cordele for a number of years, died this morning at eleven o'clock at his home in Lake City, Florida.
    Judge Morris, with his daughter, Mrs. Catherine Allen, moved from Cordele to Lake City several weeks ago, and were most pleasantly situated in their new home there. Judge Morris was ill only a short time, although he had been in failing health for some time. He was for a number of years an esteemed citizen of Cordele, and his host of friends here learned with deep regret of his passing.
    Among his survivors are his duaghter, Mrs. Catherine Allen, and granddaughter, Mrs. Guy Cobb, of Cordele. His wife preceded him in death several years ago.
    The remains will be brought to Cordele this afternoon, and funeral services will be from the chapel of the Dekle Funeral Home tomorrow morning at eleven o'clock, conducted by Rev. T. H. Williams.
    Interment will be at Chauncy, former home of the deceased.65

A third obituary states:
JUDGE J. F. MORRIS RESTS AT CHAUNCEY
LAST RITES FOR FORMER CORDELEAN HELD HERE THIS MORNING AT ELEVEN O'CLOCK
    Impressive last rites were held for Judge J. F. Morris this morning at eleven o'clock from the chapel of Dekle's Funeral Home, conducted by Rev. T. H. Williams, pastor of the Cordele Methodist Church.
    Judge Morris, was seventy-two years of age at the time of his death, and had been a resident of Cordele for a number of years prior to his removal to Lake City, Florida several weeks ago. He had been in failing health for some time.
    Judge Morris was a consistent member of the Methodist church for a long number of years, and was held in high esteem by all who knew him.
    A large concourse of relatives and friends, many from out of town, attended the funeral services here, and the floral offerings were many and beautiful.
    Mrs. T. M. Coker, and Mrs. Edd Jones sang with sweetest melody, "When They Ring Those Golden Bells For Me," with accompaniment by Mrs. Essie Ballenger Cobb.
    Following the services at the chapel, the funeral party left for Chauncy, former home of the deceased, for the committal service.
    The pallbearers were: Messrs Ernest Taylor, Frank Calloway, Jack Sheppard, Palmer Greene, Burchell Mitchell and Dr. A. J. Welchel.
    Judge Morris' survivors include: one daughter, Mrs. Catherine Allen, of Lake City, Fla., Grand daughter, Mrs. Guy T. Cobb, of Cordele, brother, C. E. Morris, of Tampa, Fla., nephew, Fred Morris of High Point, N. C.
    Those from out of town attending the funeral were, Mrs. Allen, of Lake Bity, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Morris, of field [?] and Mrs. J. F. Bonner, of Perry, Ga.

H.Charles2 Morris. Charles Morris was born circa 1863.66

Charles was enumerated with Margaret Henrietta M. Lester in the 1870 census in Perry, Houston County, Georgia, as "Charles Morris".   He was listed as a seven-year-old white male, born in Georgia.  Charles' personal property was valued at $3,000. Also enumerated in the home were "Jasper Morris," age nine, and "Jas. L. Aldridge," age 23.67
 
 



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